Korean Archive

Results in BLC Posts

From a Face-to-Face to Hybrid Intermediate Korean Course

The Korean program has had a high attrition rate from beginning (K1A) to intermediate levels (K10B) (AY 2017: 77%). In searching for a solution to this trend, my colleague, Dr. Junghee Park and I received a one-year joint BLC fellowship to develop a hybrid course for intermediate level Korean. As I report for the first…

InterSpeech 2016

I attended InterSpeech 2016 in San Francisco, California, in September, with my colleague and 2nd presenter, Minsook Kim. We presented our research entitled “Hyper-articulate production of Korean glides by age group”. InterSpeech is the one of the largest conferences in the area of phonetics and we were surprised to see that there were a lot…

The American Association of Teachers of Korean Annual Workshop and Conference

Thanks to the generous support by the Berkeley Language Center, I participated in the 20th American Association of Teachers of Korean (AATK) Annual Workshop and Conference, which was held in Monterey, CA, June 25-27, 2015. As the largest conference for the teaching of Korean in the U.S., the AATK plays a significant role in Korean…

BLC Travel Grant Report

I attended the AAAL (American Association for Applied Linguistics) Dallas 2013 in Dallas, Texas, March, 2013. I presented my research entitled “L2 accent transfer in L3 production: Evidence from L3 Korean”. This is my first participation in AAAL, which I’ve heard a lot from the Applied Linguistics people and yes, it was a valuable opportunity…

Reading TV: Graphic Overtitles in Korean TV Shows

My research starts from the recognition of the importance of teaching media literacy in Korean—a form of literacy which is becoming an essential part of language education today, since knowing how to “read” sophisticated layers of multimodal communication in the written mode of technology-mediated communication is becoming more and more a necessary skill for reading…

Results in L2 Journal Articles

Technology as a Core Part of a Teacher’s Knowledge Base in the Digital Age

We language educators are constant learners of teaching, not only of up-to-date pedagogy and technology but also the social context of target and native culture within which teaching occurs. Beyond my formal education, integral to my knowledge base are the range of student populations I have served and the variety of language teaching contexts I have encountered, such as heritage learners at UC Berkeley, the global popularity of Korean pop culture since the late 90s, and the pandemic situation since 2020. These are the local contextual factors that have affected the development of my knowledge base. To gain this knowledge base, I developed ways to integrate technology that accommodated my local contextual factors.